Man injured in Letterkenny hammer attack – two serious assaults at weekend

first_imgA man sustained serious injuries to his head after being struck by a hammer in Letterkenny at the weekend.The man was set upon at around 1am on Sunday morning in the Pearse Road area, close to the Riverside apartments.A man is believed to have been attacked by two males, who used weapons, including a hammer, during the course of the attack. Garda Rafferty asked in a weekly community alert for anyone who lives in the area and who saw or heard anything to make contact with Gardaí at Letterkenny on 074-9167100 or the Garda Confidential Line on 1800-666-111.Gardaí are appealing for witnesses to two serious assaults in Letterkenny in the early hours of Sunday morning.It is not believed that the two are connected.At around 4.30am, a male was set upon at Oldtown Road. The man was waiting on a lift at Lower Main Street when he was approach by a group of makes and one female. He was verbally abused before being attacked at Old Town Road where he received ‘quite a few injuries’, Garda Rafferty said.Again, witnesses are asked to contact Gardaí at Letterkenny on 074-9167100 or the Garda Confidential Line on 1800-666-111.Man injured in Letterkenny hammer attack – two serious assaults at weekend was last modified: April 17th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:assaultGardaiHAMMERletterkennyLetterkenny GardaiOld Town RoadPearse Roadlast_img read more

Keeping Icy Moons Warm for Billions of Years

first_imgEach spacecraft that has explored the outer solar system has yielded surprises.  It is common knowledge that Voyager scientists were blown away by the first views of active moons they expected to be cold and old.  Recent discoveries have only intensified the surprises.  Richard Kerr wrote recently in Science,1 Why is there geology on Saturn’s icy satellites?  Where did these smallish moons get the energy to refresh their impact-battered surfaces with smoothed plains, ridges, and fissures?  These questions have nagged at scientists since the Voyager flybys in the early 1980s, and the Cassini spacecraft’s recent discovery that Saturn’s Enceladus is spouting like an icy geyser has only compounded the problem.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.) (See 11/28/2005 entry about the discovery of eruptions on Enceladus, and 08/30/2005, 07/14/2005 and 03/04/2005 about its young surface and active south pole.)  The temperature of a body depends primarily on four factors: its nearness to the sun (related to its composition), its mass (related to volume), the amount of tidal flexing imposed on it, and the amount of radioactive heating in its interior.  Trouble is, small bodies short in all four quantities are looking pretty lively.  Several small, icy moons at great distances from the sun show young surfaces and eruptive activity: these include Europa, Triton, and most recently Enceladus.  Io, of course, has a great deal of volcanic activity which is only partly explained by tidal flexing.  Titan is more massive than the other Saturnian moons, but its surface looks very young and active; it may have active cryovolcanos.  And unlike all the other moons, it has a dense atmosphere that is quickly eroding.  While many of the other moons appear quiescent, some, like Ariel, Miranda, Tethys, Iapetus, show evidence of recent surface activity.     Planetary scientists never question the age of these bodies.  They unanimously assume that they are 4.6 billion years old – the consensus view of the age of our solar system.  (This is sometimes stated as “geologic time”).  Presumably, the planets and moons all formed near the beginning, 4.6 billion years ago, and have been cooling off ever since (but see 09/12/2005).  The small bodies should cool much more rapidly than the planets, because as radius decreases, surface area decreases by the square, but volume by the cube.  The smaller the body, therefore, the greater the surface area for the interior heat to leak out.     It’s interesting to watch how planetary scientists deal with surprises.  It takes creative modeling to keep a moon active that should have frozen solid billions of years ago.  Here’s what the planetary scientists have been up to: Enceladus: Stoke the Furnace:  Throw some radioactive aluminum-26 into the core furnace; maybe that will help.  Kerr reported that the Cassini team tried this to keep Enceladus warm enough to spout.  Others find this interesting, but are not convinced: “At each stage [of the calculations], there are several knobs you can twiddle,” said Francis Nimmo (UC Santa Cruz).  “There are so many free parameters it’s hard to make a strong statement.”  Why the other nearby moons, such as Mimas (same diameter) are not erupting is a problem, but Enceladus does appear to have higher density and therefore a larger core for storing the hot Al-26.  Nevertheless, the buzz around JPL is that nobody really has a good answer yet.  Enceladus is a problem moon that has scientists scratching their heads. Update 03/09/2003: A JPL Press Release says there may even be liquid water erupting, like cold versions of the geysers of Yellowstone.  “We realize that this is a radical conclusion,” said the imaging team lead.  Science Dec. 10 had a special section on Enceladus with a dozen articles from the Cassini team exploring all aspects of the bizarre moon, from images to magnetic fields, from infrared and ultraviolet measurements to in situ particle measurements.  “Finding such active geology on such a tiny moon is a big surprise,” said Joanne Baker in the introductory article.  The only other active bodies in the solar system (Earth, Triton, Io) are larger than Enceladus.  One model was offered to show how pockets of liquid water might form under the surface, but most scientists are saying this is a huge mystery. Iapetus: Slam on the Brakes:  The big midriff bulge on Saturn’s yin-yang moon Iapetus presents a different problem.  Scientists are dealing with this by having it start with a high spin rate with a good dose of aluminum-26 to keep it deformable.  If tidal interactions with Saturn forced it to spin down rapidly, maybe the bulge was able to freeze in place.  For more on Iapetus, see 01/07/2005. Titan: Hide the Goods:  Planetary scientists were surprised, and perhaps disappointed, to find no liquid oceans of methane on the surface of Titan.  The Huygens Probe landed on a dry lake bed, and the Cassini orbiter has failed to detect liquid on the surface.  At current erosion rates, the atmospheric methane would be depleted in 10 to 100 million years – just 2% its assumed age.  Clearly, scientists who want to keep Titan old need a source of methane to replenish the atmosphere.  A new theory was just published in a letter to Nature this week.2  Jonathan Lunine, who has puzzled over Titan for over 20 years, has moved the methane reservoir underground: Saturn’s largest satellite, Titan, has a massive nitrogen atmosphere containing up to 5 per cent methane near its surface.  Photochemistry in the stratosphere would remove the present-day atmospheric methane in a few tens of millions of years.  Before the Cassini-Huygens mission arrived at Saturn, widespread liquid methane or mixed hydrocarbon seas hundreds of metres in thickness were proposed as reservoirs from which methane could be resupplied to the atmosphere over geologic time.  Titan fly-by observations and ground-based observations rule out the presence of extensive bodies of liquid hydrocarbons at present, which means that methane must be derived from another source over Titan’s history.  Here we show that episodic outgassing of methane stored as clathrate hydrates within an icy shell above an ammonia-enriched water ocean is the most likely explanation for Titan’s atmospheric methane.  The other possible explanations all fail because they cannot explain the absence of surface liquid reservoirs and/or the low dissipative state of the interior.  On the basis of our models, we predict that future fly-bys should reveal the existence of both a subsurface water ocean and a rocky core, and should detect more cryovolcanic edifices. (See also: ESA report and Science Now.  For earlier stories on Titan, see 12/05/2005, 06/09/2005, 05/18/2005, 04/08/2005 and 03/11/2005).  Cassini just made its 13th pass over Titan on Monday, and has many more passes this year, so we shall have to wait and see.  For dramatic images of the most recent flyby, showing sharp boundaries between dark and light areas, see the Cassini Titan-11 flyby page and raw images: here is a good sample. While modelers have many dials and switches to fiddle with, one factor may be complicating the matter.  Kubo et al. did experiments with a high-pressure form of ice known as Ice II and found that it deforms, or “creeps” much faster than previously thought – by up to two orders of magnitude, depending on the grain size.  Their paper in Science3 was joined by a commentary from Peter Sammonds,4 who agreed that “This realization could change our understanding of the dynamics and evolution of these planetary bodies”  What this implies specifically was not made clear.  Perhaps it means that an icy moon’s interior would reach equilibrium in less time.  You figure it out: Kubo et al. argue that grain size-sensitive creep of Ice I and Ice II plausibly dominates the evolution and dynamics of the interiors of the medium to large icy moons of the outer solar system.  Ice II is considerably more viscous than Ice I.  The transition from Ice I to Ice II, which occurs at depth, is accompanied by an increase in viscosity of four orders of magnitude.  If grain size-sensitive creep does not operate, then the increase in viscosity would be six orders of magnitude.  So if grain size-sensitive creep is not taken into account as a deformation mechanism, estimates for viscosities of the interiors of the icy moons are off by about two orders of magnitude.  Such a difference would have profound implications for interpreting their evolution and dynamics. (See also Lawrence Livermore press release.)  Whatever this means, modelers apparently didn’t set the knob right on this parameter before now.center_img 1Richard Kerr, “How Saturn’s Icy Moons Get a (Geologic) Life,” Science, 6 January 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5757, p. 29, DOI: 10.1126/science.311.5757.29. 2Gabriel Tobie, Jonathan Lunine and Christophe Sotin, “Episodic outgassing as the origin of atmospheric methane on Titan,” Nature 440, 61-64 (2 March 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature04497. 3Kubo et al., “Grain Size-Sensitive Creep in Ice II,” Science, 3 March 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5765, pp. 1267 – 1269, DOI: 10.1126/science.1121296. 4Peter Sammonds, “Creep and Flow on the Icy Moons of the Outer Planets,” Science, No sooner did the word “water” appear in news reports about Enceladus, when reporters started talking about “life.”  The press release twists the evidence for a young Enceladus into evidence for old evolution: “Scientists still have many questions.  Why is Enceladus currently so active?  Are other sites on Enceladus active?  Might this activity have been continuous enough over the moon’s history for life to have had a chance to take hold in the moon’s interior?”  Geological activity is not necessarily related to biological activity.  Enceladus is not a case for OOL, but for YEC.  Who are these spin doctors that write press blurbs like this gem from a Cassini press agent: “A masterpiece of deep time and wrenching gravity, the tortured surface of Saturn’s moon Enceladus and its fascinating ongoing geologic activity tell the story of the ancient and present struggles of one tiny world.”  Get real.     Does a model correspond to reality?  This is an interesting question in philosophy of science.  Some things are too difficult to observe and explain.  A model can provide a “cartoon” of the problem to help make it manageable (or provide comic relief).  Based on the model, scientists make predictions, or open the model to falsification.  Confidence in the model grows if it passes these tests.  Unfortunately, the more switches, dials and free parameters in the model, the more the model becomes immune to falsification, and the more other models might make similar predictions.  Consequently, it becomes increasingly difficult to know if the model really connects with the real world, or is just a convenient fiction.  What we wonder is why there is a padlock on the rheostat labeled, “age of the solar system.”  Rumor has it the Darwin Party put it there.(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Grooveshark Pens an Angry Open Letter to the Music Industry (cc’s Google, Apple)

first_imgRelated Posts The peer-to-peer music streaming service Grooveshark has had a series of run-ins with mobile providers. Its iOS app was pulled from the App Store in August of last year, and its Android app was booted from the Android Marketplace earlier this month. The company has now fired back at the music industry and at Apple and Google, contending there’s nothing illegal about its app.Grooveshark works differently than many other streaming music services. Rather than solely relying on licensing deals with the record industry in order to offer music content (streaming or downloads), Grooveshark users upload their songs to the catalog, which can in turn be streamed by anyone with the app. That peer-to-peer element clearly runs afoul of the record industry’s longstanding argument that this sort of sharing is stealing.Grooveshark insists that it complies with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), and that it processes takedowns as they’re filed. Indeed, the company says it’s taken down over 1.76 million files and suspended the upload privileges of over 22,000 users.Grooveshark says it focuses on licensing with these individual users, but it is also working to secure rights with record labels. It touts licensing deals with over a thousand labels, as well as payment agreements to performing rights organizations. “These are not the characteristics of a company ‘dedicated to copyright infringement,” something that the RIAA and labels have accused. Grooveshark makes it clear in its open letter that it wants to defend its name: “In light of the recent misleading press concerning Grooveshark’s application, it is important to make clear that we will defend our service, and the letter and the spirit of the law, in court and in Congress. We will defend our name and our ideals for the sake of our users who expect modern delivery systems and comprehensive access across devices, for the sake of artists and content owners who fear another decade of decline, and for other innovators who continue to bring new ideas to market through the expression of creativity in the form of technology.”For Android users who want to skirt the ban from the Android Marketplace, you can download the Grooveshark app directly from the company homepage. For iPhone users, well, you’re out of luck. 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnoutcenter_img Tags:#music#web 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… audrey watterslast_img read more

Olympic champion among 4 Thai weightlifters to test positive

first_imgMOST READ Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting The IWF said all world championship competitors’ tests initially came back clean, but the Thai cases followed extra analysis of certain “target” athletes “using the most sophisticated available technique” at a German lab.“The IWF remains committed to implement the most advanced testing techniques to ensure that the very small minority who cheat are identified and sanctioned,” the federation said.The IWF has previously tried to fight doping by banning countries with the most cases and reducing their Olympic qualification spots. Russia and China were among nine countries banned from international weightlifting for a year from 2017, but have since returned to competition.ADVERTISEMENT PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss FILE – In this Saturday, Aug. 6, 2016 file photo, Sopita Tanasan of Thailand, competes in the women’s 48kg weightlifting competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Tanasan won the gold medal. Olympic gold medalist Sopita Tanasan with two world champion weightlifters are among four Thai weightlifters to test positive for banned steroids, the International Weightlifting Federation announced on Tuesday Jan. 22, 2019. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)BUDAPEST, Hungary — An Olympic champion was among four Thai weightlifters to test positive for doping, the International Weightlifting Federation said Tuesday.Sopita Tanasan, who won gold at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, tested positive for steroids and artificial testosterone after finishing fourth at the world championships in November.ADVERTISEMENT Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusationscenter_img LA Revilla draws inspiration from fiancée Den Lazaro, helps Phoenix win Two others, Thunya Sukcharoen and Sukanya Srisurat, won world titles at the competition and risk being stripped of their medals after also testing positive for at least one anabolic steroid and artificial testosterone. If found guilty, Srisurat faces a potential eight-year ban for a second offense.Chitchanok Pulsabsakul also failed a doping test after finishing sixth.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsWeightlifting is under pressure from the International Olympic Committee to crack down on drug use after dozens of doping cases. In one event from the 2012 Olympics, six of the top seven finishers were later disqualified for doping.Weightlifting is still on the Olympic program for next year’s Tokyo Games, but only provisionally for 2024. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes View commentslast_img read more

Ghosal, Dipika assure India of twin squash medals

first_imgSaurav Ghosal and Dipika Pallikal assured India of at least two more Asian Games medals after reaching the semi-finals of their respective singles events at the Yeorumul Squash Courts here Sunday.Ghosal entered the men’s singles semis with a 3-1 win over Pakistan’s Nasir Iqbal. The top seeded Ghosal won 11-6, 9-11, 11-2, 11-9 in the quarter-final which lasted 58 minutes.In the women’s singles, Pallikal prevailed 3-2 in a keenly-contested quarter-final against compatriot and doubles partner Joshna Chinappa. She won 7-11, 11-9, 11-8, 15-17, 11-9 in an hour and 41 minutes.Ghosal, who is a two-time Asiad bronze medallist, next faces a tougher opponent in 2006 Asiad champion Ong Beng Hee of Malaysia, who defeated Hong Kong’s Au Chun Ming 3-1 (11-8, 9-11, 11-9, 11-7) in the other quarter-final.The Indian started the game on a bright note against the 20-year-old Iqbal, winning the first game 11-6. But a few mistakes on Ghosal’s part allowed Iqbal to equalise 1-1 as the World No.16 Indian went down 9-11.However, an unflustered Ghosal brought all his experience to the fore and remained calm to get his rhythm back and won the next two games 11-2 and 11-9 to seal the tie in his favour.Later, World No.12 Dipika defeated her doubles partner Joshna Chinappa, with whom she won India’s maiden squash doubles gold at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, after dropping the opening game in a pulsating contest.Joshna took the lead with an 11-7 win in the first game but Pallikal bounced back to win the second and third games 11-9 and 11-8. Chinappa restored parity in the fourth, clinching the game 17-15 but Pallikal held her nerve to claim the final game 11-9 to shut the contest.advertisementlast_img read more

Large crowd gathers in Toronto for singalong tribute to Gord Downie

first_imgDaveed Goldman and Nobu Adilman wanted to pay tribute to late Tragically Hip singer Gord Downie after learning of his death.And so the directors of Choir! Choir! Choir!, a Toronto-based singalong collective, invited fans to Nathan Phillips Square on Tuesday night to honour Downie the best way they could — through his music.“When we lose some of the great ones, if we can provide a space where people can come together and share the music and feel connected in a difficult time, then we’ll do it,” Adilman said. “It just felt like the right thing to do and I feel like these tributes are happening all over the country and big or small, they all matter.”Downie died last Tuesday at age 53. Nearly two years ago, he was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an invasive brain tumour with one of the poorest survival rates of any cancer.More than a thousand people gathered to sing about a dozen songs from the Hip as their tribute to the legendary Canadian band.People braved the brisk, windy, 10 C weather to belt out songs such as “Wheat Kings,” “Bobcaygeon” and “Courage.” Downie’s “The Stranger,” off his solo album “Secret Path,” was also played.Stylish suit jackets and hats similar to the ones Downie wore on the Hip’s “Man Machine Poem” tour in 2016 were worn. There were also people sporting hockey jerseys bearing the Hip’s name.Children were placed on their parents shoulders to get a better view, while others lit candles in honour of the late musician. That night in Toronto!! #GordDownie sing along at city hall!! @KiSS925 @CityNews pic.twitter.com/XsRka8Mxfd— Maurie Sherman (@DamnitMaurie) October 25, 2017 Downie’s older brother, Mike, made an appearance on stage near the end of the set to thank those in attendance, which was met with a rousing applause from the crowd.“I have to say that over the last week, the outpouring of emotion, grief and love has been overwhelming,” Mike said. “And my family and I have felt it and its made things easier and its made things harder.“Made it easier because you showed how much you loved our brother and harder because we realized how many people were hurting and how many people were really affected by this.”Mike also took the opportunity to talk about the Secret Path project, which he and his brother worked on. Choir! Choir! Choir! had asked that those in attendance to make a minimum donation of $5 to the Gord Downie and Chanie Wenjack Fund.Mike said that “it’s up to all of us” to help the reconciliation efforts.“I don’t think the government can fix it, I don’t think there’s a program big enough to fix it, I think it’s going to take everybody doing their part,” he said.“We think we’re a young country, but we’re not. We think we’re 150 years old, but we’re not. If we tried a little harder, if we brought in the Indigenous people that have been here for 12,000 years, we could be something so much different. And we would be better for it and I think we would be the envy of the world.”Choir! Choir! Choir! capped off the show with some audience members onstage to sing “Ahead by a Century.”“Gord Downie has meant so much to this country, he’s given so much and we just wanted to celebrate him and his music,” Adilman said.last_img read more

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