Tag: 阿拉爱上海最新地址

Bank on Bigdaddykool

first_imgBIGDADDYKOOL, a top contender for the June 25 Cal’s Jamaica Derby, looks the one to beat when he takes on six fellow three-year-olds in the opening restricted allowance race (non-winners of two) over 1700 metres at Caymanas Park tomorrow. Trained by Anthony Nunes, BIGDADDYKOOL was a fast-finishing fourth (beaten 4-1/4 lengths) to FUTURE KING in the Post to Post 2000 Guineas over a mile on April 9, this after running miles wide into the straight. He has worked well in preparation for this race, and with the competition less than fierce, should have little difficulty in beating THE PROMISE LAND and company. Top apprentice Linton Steadman has the ride from the convenient mark of 53.0kg. TWILIGHT CITIZEN, a fast-finishing second to stable-companion to TRADITIONAL STORM over 1300 metres on April 23, is tipped to go one better in the second race over a similar trip to be contested by eight starters, including GOLD SCREW, who just failed to stave off TARANTINO over 1820 metres recently, and MINY LEE, who was third in that race. GOLD SCREW will have lots of supporters even with female apprentice Mellisa Ward replacing former champion jockey Wesley Henry, but the Carl Anderson-trained TWILIGHT CITIZEN, with apprentice AndrÈ Powell, only needs to get it right at the start to score an overdue win. The third race should provide the lightly raced RAWALPINDI EXPRESS with his maiden win on his fifth start. True, the five-year-old son of Coded Warning is proving expensive to follow, but with champion jockey Shane Ellis now taking the ride, the hint should be taken. IDON’TKNOW looks the principal danger in a seven-strong field over 1100 metres. Recent winner PRINCE O’SHAUN, now back over an ideal trip after flopping over the straight behind MIRACLE RECOVERY on April 24, looks nicely off at the weights (53.0kg) with 3.0kg claiming apprentice Bebeto Harvey, and should rebound with a win over 1500 metres. (1) BIGDADDYKOOL (2) TWILIGHT CITIZEN/ GOLD SCREW (3) RAWALPINDI EXPRESS/IDON’TKNOW (4) PRINCE O’SHAUN/BURNING MEDIC (5) AQUILO/EL CLIENTE (6) URBAN PRINCIPAL/ DUSSELDORF FIRST SUPER-6 FANCIES LIVE CONTENDER BURNING MEDIC, who finished a close second to MIRACLE RECOVERY, looks a live contender in the 10-horse field, along with the bold front runner TROPICALDEPRESSION. The last two races in the first Super-6 should be won by AQUILO (Javanne Patterson up) and URBAN PRINCIPAL (Odean Edwards), both of whom finished second last time out. Their respective dangers are EL CLIENTE (Omar Walker) and DUSSELDORF, with Shane Ellis up.last_img read more

Power Smart’s conservation lab arrives in the city

first_imgPhoto: Some of the Power Smart Team members stand infront of the conservation lab, and strike a “lights off” pose – (From left to right) – Charlea Mitchell, Aleah Gagnon, Cailey Borland and Nikki Lunoch – Christine Rumleskie/Energeticcity.caThe B.C. Hydro Power Smart conservation lab is in Fort St. John this week.City officials today welcomed the 29 foot trailer, which holds three flat-screen televisions and an interactive game that encourages energy efficiency.- Advertisement -Cailey Borland, a member of the Community Outreach Team, says even though the trailer and SUV look like energy-guzzlers, they have been modified to use as little energy as possible.Borland says the trailer has been gutted to become as light as possible, and the SUV is a Hybrid.[asset|aid=1768|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=8aa4b5539f2e89b4c8b9c6da3f40ec0e-Cailey Borland 1_3_Pub.mp3]The hard-to-miss lime green conservation lab will be at the Fort St. John  Rona on Friday.Advertisement After its appearance at the Fort St. John Rona, the conservation lab will make its way to Hudson’s Hope.Photo: Executive Director of NEAT Sally Emory(left) plays an interactive game inside the mobile conservation lab with Acting Mayor Larry Evans – Christine Rumleskie/Energeticcity.ca The goal is to recruit community members to join Team Power Smart, where people pledge to conserve at least 10 per cent of their energy.If the target is met, residents have a chance to win tickets to an Olympic event in Vancouver.Acting Mayor Larry Evans took part in the celebrations. He says the quickest way to start saving energy is to turn off the lights.[asset|aid=1769|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=8aa4b5539f2e89b4c8b9c6da3f40ec0e-Larry Evans – powersmart 1_1_Pub.mp3]Advertisementlast_img read more

Judge charges Pinochet, puts him on house arrest

first_imgSANTIAGO, Chile – Former Chilean dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet was indicted on human rights charges Thursday and placed under house arrest, hours after he made bail on unrelated corruption charges filed only a day earlier. In a widely expected decision, Judge Victor Montiglio charged Pinochet in connection with the kidnapping and disappearance of six dissidents in the early years of his 1973-90 dictatorship, his office said. Montiglio sent a court secretary to Pinochet’s Santiago mansion to inform the general of the charges, which will force him to spend his 90th birthday today under arrest. The judge did not grant Pinochet bail. There was no immediate comment from Pinochet’s lawyer, Pablo Rodriguez. The judge who preceded Cerda in the case, Sergio Munoz, estimated Pinochet’s overseas fortune at $23 million. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals The new indictment involves the disappearance of six dissidents arrested by Pinochet’s security services in late 1974. They were among 119 people, some of whose bodies were later found in Argentina, who disappeared in a case known as Operation Colombo. The Pinochet government claimed at the time that the dissidents were killed in clashes involving rival armed groups opposed to him. Friends and relatives had planned a luncheon at Pinochet’s house to celebrate his birthday but were canceling the event. “I doubt the boss will be in a mood to attend,” Pinochet’s spokesman, retired Gen. Guillermo Garin, told The Associated Press. Pinochet was indicted and put under house arrest on Wednesday by another judge, Carlos Cerda, on charges of tax evasion and corruption. Early Thursday, the Santiago Court of Appeals granted Pinochet freedom on an $11,500 bond. A government lawyer had asked the court to increase the bail substantially, saying Pinochet was not a poor man and continued to have access to some funds. But defense lawyers said the retired general has no money because his accounts have been frozen. last_img read more

Keeping Icy Moons Warm for Billions of Years

first_imgEach spacecraft that has explored the outer solar system has yielded surprises.  It is common knowledge that Voyager scientists were blown away by the first views of active moons they expected to be cold and old.  Recent discoveries have only intensified the surprises.  Richard Kerr wrote recently in Science,1 Why is there geology on Saturn’s icy satellites?  Where did these smallish moons get the energy to refresh their impact-battered surfaces with smoothed plains, ridges, and fissures?  These questions have nagged at scientists since the Voyager flybys in the early 1980s, and the Cassini spacecraft’s recent discovery that Saturn’s Enceladus is spouting like an icy geyser has only compounded the problem.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.) (See 11/28/2005 entry about the discovery of eruptions on Enceladus, and 08/30/2005, 07/14/2005 and 03/04/2005 about its young surface and active south pole.)  The temperature of a body depends primarily on four factors: its nearness to the sun (related to its composition), its mass (related to volume), the amount of tidal flexing imposed on it, and the amount of radioactive heating in its interior.  Trouble is, small bodies short in all four quantities are looking pretty lively.  Several small, icy moons at great distances from the sun show young surfaces and eruptive activity: these include Europa, Triton, and most recently Enceladus.  Io, of course, has a great deal of volcanic activity which is only partly explained by tidal flexing.  Titan is more massive than the other Saturnian moons, but its surface looks very young and active; it may have active cryovolcanos.  And unlike all the other moons, it has a dense atmosphere that is quickly eroding.  While many of the other moons appear quiescent, some, like Ariel, Miranda, Tethys, Iapetus, show evidence of recent surface activity.     Planetary scientists never question the age of these bodies.  They unanimously assume that they are 4.6 billion years old – the consensus view of the age of our solar system.  (This is sometimes stated as “geologic time”).  Presumably, the planets and moons all formed near the beginning, 4.6 billion years ago, and have been cooling off ever since (but see 09/12/2005).  The small bodies should cool much more rapidly than the planets, because as radius decreases, surface area decreases by the square, but volume by the cube.  The smaller the body, therefore, the greater the surface area for the interior heat to leak out.     It’s interesting to watch how planetary scientists deal with surprises.  It takes creative modeling to keep a moon active that should have frozen solid billions of years ago.  Here’s what the planetary scientists have been up to: Enceladus: Stoke the Furnace:  Throw some radioactive aluminum-26 into the core furnace; maybe that will help.  Kerr reported that the Cassini team tried this to keep Enceladus warm enough to spout.  Others find this interesting, but are not convinced: “At each stage [of the calculations], there are several knobs you can twiddle,” said Francis Nimmo (UC Santa Cruz).  “There are so many free parameters it’s hard to make a strong statement.”  Why the other nearby moons, such as Mimas (same diameter) are not erupting is a problem, but Enceladus does appear to have higher density and therefore a larger core for storing the hot Al-26.  Nevertheless, the buzz around JPL is that nobody really has a good answer yet.  Enceladus is a problem moon that has scientists scratching their heads. Update 03/09/2003: A JPL Press Release says there may even be liquid water erupting, like cold versions of the geysers of Yellowstone.  “We realize that this is a radical conclusion,” said the imaging team lead.  Science Dec. 10 had a special section on Enceladus with a dozen articles from the Cassini team exploring all aspects of the bizarre moon, from images to magnetic fields, from infrared and ultraviolet measurements to in situ particle measurements.  “Finding such active geology on such a tiny moon is a big surprise,” said Joanne Baker in the introductory article.  The only other active bodies in the solar system (Earth, Triton, Io) are larger than Enceladus.  One model was offered to show how pockets of liquid water might form under the surface, but most scientists are saying this is a huge mystery. Iapetus: Slam on the Brakes:  The big midriff bulge on Saturn’s yin-yang moon Iapetus presents a different problem.  Scientists are dealing with this by having it start with a high spin rate with a good dose of aluminum-26 to keep it deformable.  If tidal interactions with Saturn forced it to spin down rapidly, maybe the bulge was able to freeze in place.  For more on Iapetus, see 01/07/2005. Titan: Hide the Goods:  Planetary scientists were surprised, and perhaps disappointed, to find no liquid oceans of methane on the surface of Titan.  The Huygens Probe landed on a dry lake bed, and the Cassini orbiter has failed to detect liquid on the surface.  At current erosion rates, the atmospheric methane would be depleted in 10 to 100 million years – just 2% its assumed age.  Clearly, scientists who want to keep Titan old need a source of methane to replenish the atmosphere.  A new theory was just published in a letter to Nature this week.2  Jonathan Lunine, who has puzzled over Titan for over 20 years, has moved the methane reservoir underground: Saturn’s largest satellite, Titan, has a massive nitrogen atmosphere containing up to 5 per cent methane near its surface.  Photochemistry in the stratosphere would remove the present-day atmospheric methane in a few tens of millions of years.  Before the Cassini-Huygens mission arrived at Saturn, widespread liquid methane or mixed hydrocarbon seas hundreds of metres in thickness were proposed as reservoirs from which methane could be resupplied to the atmosphere over geologic time.  Titan fly-by observations and ground-based observations rule out the presence of extensive bodies of liquid hydrocarbons at present, which means that methane must be derived from another source over Titan’s history.  Here we show that episodic outgassing of methane stored as clathrate hydrates within an icy shell above an ammonia-enriched water ocean is the most likely explanation for Titan’s atmospheric methane.  The other possible explanations all fail because they cannot explain the absence of surface liquid reservoirs and/or the low dissipative state of the interior.  On the basis of our models, we predict that future fly-bys should reveal the existence of both a subsurface water ocean and a rocky core, and should detect more cryovolcanic edifices. (See also: ESA report and Science Now.  For earlier stories on Titan, see 12/05/2005, 06/09/2005, 05/18/2005, 04/08/2005 and 03/11/2005).  Cassini just made its 13th pass over Titan on Monday, and has many more passes this year, so we shall have to wait and see.  For dramatic images of the most recent flyby, showing sharp boundaries between dark and light areas, see the Cassini Titan-11 flyby page and raw images: here is a good sample. While modelers have many dials and switches to fiddle with, one factor may be complicating the matter.  Kubo et al. did experiments with a high-pressure form of ice known as Ice II and found that it deforms, or “creeps” much faster than previously thought – by up to two orders of magnitude, depending on the grain size.  Their paper in Science3 was joined by a commentary from Peter Sammonds,4 who agreed that “This realization could change our understanding of the dynamics and evolution of these planetary bodies”  What this implies specifically was not made clear.  Perhaps it means that an icy moon’s interior would reach equilibrium in less time.  You figure it out: Kubo et al. argue that grain size-sensitive creep of Ice I and Ice II plausibly dominates the evolution and dynamics of the interiors of the medium to large icy moons of the outer solar system.  Ice II is considerably more viscous than Ice I.  The transition from Ice I to Ice II, which occurs at depth, is accompanied by an increase in viscosity of four orders of magnitude.  If grain size-sensitive creep does not operate, then the increase in viscosity would be six orders of magnitude.  So if grain size-sensitive creep is not taken into account as a deformation mechanism, estimates for viscosities of the interiors of the icy moons are off by about two orders of magnitude.  Such a difference would have profound implications for interpreting their evolution and dynamics. (See also Lawrence Livermore press release.)  Whatever this means, modelers apparently didn’t set the knob right on this parameter before now.center_img 1Richard Kerr, “How Saturn’s Icy Moons Get a (Geologic) Life,” Science, 6 January 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5757, p. 29, DOI: 10.1126/science.311.5757.29. 2Gabriel Tobie, Jonathan Lunine and Christophe Sotin, “Episodic outgassing as the origin of atmospheric methane on Titan,” Nature 440, 61-64 (2 March 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature04497. 3Kubo et al., “Grain Size-Sensitive Creep in Ice II,” Science, 3 March 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5765, pp. 1267 – 1269, DOI: 10.1126/science.1121296. 4Peter Sammonds, “Creep and Flow on the Icy Moons of the Outer Planets,” Science, No sooner did the word “water” appear in news reports about Enceladus, when reporters started talking about “life.”  The press release twists the evidence for a young Enceladus into evidence for old evolution: “Scientists still have many questions.  Why is Enceladus currently so active?  Are other sites on Enceladus active?  Might this activity have been continuous enough over the moon’s history for life to have had a chance to take hold in the moon’s interior?”  Geological activity is not necessarily related to biological activity.  Enceladus is not a case for OOL, but for YEC.  Who are these spin doctors that write press blurbs like this gem from a Cassini press agent: “A masterpiece of deep time and wrenching gravity, the tortured surface of Saturn’s moon Enceladus and its fascinating ongoing geologic activity tell the story of the ancient and present struggles of one tiny world.”  Get real.     Does a model correspond to reality?  This is an interesting question in philosophy of science.  Some things are too difficult to observe and explain.  A model can provide a “cartoon” of the problem to help make it manageable (or provide comic relief).  Based on the model, scientists make predictions, or open the model to falsification.  Confidence in the model grows if it passes these tests.  Unfortunately, the more switches, dials and free parameters in the model, the more the model becomes immune to falsification, and the more other models might make similar predictions.  Consequently, it becomes increasingly difficult to know if the model really connects with the real world, or is just a convenient fiction.  What we wonder is why there is a padlock on the rheostat labeled, “age of the solar system.”  Rumor has it the Darwin Party put it there.(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ant Pedometer Discovered

first_imgAnts have dumbfounded scientists again.  It appears they count their steps when they walk, and keep track how far they have gone.  Reporting in Science,1 a trio of German and Swiss scientists tested desert ants by making some walk on specially-designed stilts and others walk on stumps of cut-off legs.  The first overshot their target, and the second group undershot it by the amount proportional to the change in leg length.    Another amazing fact is that the ants can use their mental pedometers to reckon how far they are from home, then take a direct route back.  That would seem to require mathematical skill beyond just counting steps.  Indeed it does; not only do the ants have a sophisticated onboard navigation system, but also celestial navigation equipment.  The team explained,Foraging Saharan desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis, use a mode of dead reckoning known as path integration to monitor their current position relative to the nest and to find their way home.  This enables them to return on a direct route, rather than retracing the tortuous outbound journey performed when searching for food items in their flat desert habitat, which is often completely devoid of landmarks.  The path integrator requires two kinds of input information: about directions steered, as obtained via the ant’s celestial compass, and about distance traveled, as gauged by the ant’s odometer.See also Live Science, National Geographic and New Scientist.  The team also found that the ants could learn to adapt to their new circumstances.  Regarding the surgical procedures used in the experiment, the scientists were quick to explain that ants don’t feel pain at having their legs amputated.1Wittlinger, Wehner and Wolf, “The Ant Odometer: Stepping on Stilts and Stumps,” Science, 30 June 2006: Vol. 312. no. 5782, pp. 1965 – 1967, DOI: 10.1126/science.1126912.There was no mention of evolution in this paper.  Only in evolutionary theory would someone attempt to say, with a straight face, that celestial compasses, path integrators and odometers are the result of a blind process lacking a navigation target.    This discovery is all the more reason to get the kids an Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm (03/16/2006).  It might stimulate a good science project, too.  If stilts, why not pogo sticks?  or how about a treadmill or moving sidewalk?  or a rotating table?  Don’t let students be cruel to the little puzzle-solvers, but use it as an opportunity to reverse-engineer the amazing GPS software embedded in their tiny heads (not referring to the students’ heads, of course, but to those of the ants).(Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Gratitude Protects Against Health Loss

first_imgA study in the “new science of gratitude” showed that thankfulness is good therapy.  Researchers at UC Davis and Mississippi University for Women tracked 12 female patients who kept journals of their hospital stays while receiving organ transplants.  A control group just reported “medication side-effects, how they felt about life overall, how connected they were to others and how they felt about the upcoming day.”  Another group answered the same questions but was asked to add five things they were thankful for, and why.  Guess which group fared better.    “After 21 days, mental health and general wellbeing scores had risen for patients in the gratitude group but declined for those in the control group,” the article continued.  “Patients in the control group also reported a loss of vitality, while the grateful patients experienced no change.”Gratitude is a healthful attitude.  It’s a Biblical attitude.  The Bible is filled with admonitions to be thankful (e.g., I Thessalonians 5, Philippians 4, Colossians 3).  Even in a hospital, there are many things to be thankful for.  The patients in this study should have been grateful that donors made their organs available for transplanting, and that medicine has advanced far enough to make transplanting a life-saving option, and that the body is filled with wondrous repair mechanisms (see next entry).  It should be easy to list dozens of blessings.  How many things can you count right now?  Don’t do it just for preventive medicine; really be thankful.  If you do it just for the health benefits, you’re not being grateful; you’re being selfish.    Even with our modern affluence, gratitude is in short supply these days.  How many of your coworkers ever express true appreciation for the blessings they enjoy?  More often you are likely to hear the latest gripe about corporate politics, working conditions, the traffic on the commute, low wages, how hard I worked without being noticed, the slop the cafeteria is serving, or whatever.  A day living in North Korea might cure a lot of that.  Even the cheerful gossip often suggests cynicism – something stupid the boss did, an egregious mistake someone made, or the like – it’s the laughter of fools (Ecclesiastes 7:6), not the positive, uplifting joy of thankfulness.  People would look at you funny if you said, “Wow, what a beautiful day!  Is this a great country, or what?  I’m so glad to feel terrific and have this awesome job.  I can hardly wait to get to work!”  But then, guess who is likely to be in better health.    Lack of gratitude rides on a current of pride and selfishness.  It conveys the attitude “I deserve better than this” or “the world owes me something.”  No you don’t, and no, the world doesn’t.  We’re all sinners and deserve judgment, remember?  We should be thankful for each moment of mercy.  The beginning of your list might be, “I’m very thankful for another day in which I did not get what I deserve.”    Thanklessness and its root of pride and selfishness also underlies much of the fixation on biological evolution.    It makes God angry.  Paul wrote in Romans 1 that the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who suppress the truth in unrighteousness, because the truth about God is self-evident within them and has been revealed to them through what has been made (created).  In spite of the evidence, they exchanged the truth of God for a lie.  And here’s the tie-in: what is producing the stream of atheistic rage against creationism (08/08/2007) spewed by the sourpuss spokespeople of the Darwin Party?  “because, although they knew God, they did not glorify Him as God, nor were thankful”    Some people need a heart transplant.  Recommended surgeon: the Great Physician.  Offices conveniently located throughout time and space.  Hours: 24 x 7.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

2010 Fifa World Cup: 100 days to kickoff 2

first_imgThe Rainbow Nation was in a party mood on Tuesday 2 March in an exuberant and colourful celebration marking 100 days until the kickoff to South Africa’s 2010 Fifa World Cup, with flags, vuvuzelas, makarapas and football gear on display at a concert held in northern Johannesburg.Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.  Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image Photo: Bongani Nkosi, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com• Download high-resolution image {loadposition fifa}last_img read more

One free Fall Soil Test for Farm Bureau members

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentShow your Farm Bureau membership card at Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake or Trumbull County OSU Extension offices between Oct. 25 and Nov. 30, 2018 to get your FREE test!  Only valid for Farm Bureau members.*Who should soil test?  Anyone applying lime and/or fertilizer to gardens, yards, pastures, hay and crop fields, etc.Why should you fall soil test?  According to OSU Extension, fall is an ideal time to sample soil for several reasons:  1.  Soils often have an ideal moisture range that makes sampling easy.  2.  It gives producers ample time to apply fertilizer or lime before the next crop.  3.  It helps ensure spring planting will not be delayed.When can you get your free test?  Oct. 25-Nov. 30 during your county OSU Extension office’s regular business hours.How do you obtain your free test?  Go to your county OSU Extension office, show your Farm Bureau membership card, (call 440-426-2195 for your ID number if you don’t have a card,) pick up your FREE soil test, have Extension analyze your results if needed.Any questions, call Farm Bureau at 440-426-2195 or email us at [email protected]. View the flyer here.*Pick up your free soil test at your county Extension office:Ashtabula:  30 Wall Street, Jefferson, OHGeauga:  14269 Claridon-Troy Road, Burton, OHLake:  99 E Erie Street, Painesville, OHTrumbull:  520 W Main Street, Cortland, OH     Leave a Commentlast_img read more

5 Reasons: Why Moto G second-gen is better than its predecessor

first_imgWithin a couple of months ahead of its launch, Motorola has overhauled Moto G, its top selling smartphone. The second generation Moto G offers much more than its predecessor at a lesser price. Here are the top 5 distinguishing features that make second generation Moto G better:1. Bigger screen: The new Moto G appears to be identical as the old one, yet has a somewhat greater screen. The new model has a presentation bigger than the old model by 0.5 inches yet the resolution remains same. Its 5 inch 720p screen delivers great colors. Though, the bigger screen with similar pixels tends to lower the pixel density, but the difference is too minimal to be able to be noticed by naked eyes.2. Enhanced Camera: The Moto G (second generation) accompanies an 8 MP camera. The rear camera has been upgraded from 5MP in the previous version to 8 MP in the newer phone, while the front camera has been upgraded to 2 MP from 1.3 MP.3. Extra storage capacity: A noteworthy change in the second-gen Moto G is that it supports a microSD card slot. The earlier version of Moto G didn’t sported expandable memory option.4. Double speakers: Unlike the old Moto G that accompanied a speaker barbecue at the back, the new Moto G has double speakers at the front that deliver decently clamorous sound in normal surroundings. But in noisy surroundings the results may vary. Other than this, headphones also offer a good sound quality.5. Less expensive: The new avatar of Moto G has been upgraded in most of it’s specifications, however one thing remains unchanged or rather has been reduced- The Price. The 16 GB variant of second-gen Moto G comes at a price which is INR 1000 less than the first model. The brand is yet to announce its 8 GB version.advertisementlast_img read more